disability support

  • Getting family and friends to understand you’re disabled

    Getting Family and Friends to Understand You're Disabled

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    very body is slightly different and will react to medications in different ways. What works for one person might be a horror show filled with unwanted side effects for someone else and there is no way of knowing until you try the medication

    The problem we have is that most people’s understanding of disability starts and ends with wheelchairs and the idea that this is incredibly tragic. Because your family and friends love you, it means they fight extra hard to protect you from what they believe is a tragedy. But, as many of us in the disabled community know (or I hope we are learning), disability isn’t the suck fest that everyone makes it out to be.

    Yes, there are bad days and things we wish didn’t exist *cough cough ableism cough* but being disabled isn’t something to be ashamed of. For many in our community, identifying as disabled enables us access to the services and support we vitally need.

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  • How to create a support system

    How to Create a Support System

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    aring for a chronically ill bod is tiring, not to mention expensive, but what if there was a better way? People living with chronic illnesses need access to so many things, in fact you need a team of therapists, physios, occupational therapists, nutritionists and so many more. However, it’s rare we get the chance to have all that and even if you do it’s unlikely everyone in the team really understands chronic illness and disability, which is the key to getting the best care. Finding a specialist who really ‘gets’ what an illness or condition means for everyday living can take months or even years of research, trial and error, and is often an unaffordable expense.

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