disabled community

  • Feeling confident as a visibly disabled person

    Feeling Confident as a Visabiliy Disabled Person

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    here is nothing quite like the first time you go out with a new mobility aid. ⁠It doesn't matter if this is your first time using one or you've just upgraded from one type to another. The questions, stares and insecurities all come flooding in and leave you wondering if you really need it. ⁠For a non-disabled person, this can be hard to imagine, with the idea that only people with obvious limb disabilities require mobility aids still a common attitude.

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  • Why is lived experience so important?

    Why Do I Resent The Healthy People In My Life?

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    r, you know, what the hell is it? I have to explain the importance of lived experiences so regularly I feel like every person who reads this blog (particularly those who aren’t in the disabled community themselves) needs to keep passing it on to another person to read until, finally, the whole world just gets why lived experience is so crucial!

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  • My story has value

    My Story Has Value

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    his quote from Hannah Gadsby's Nanette has always resonated with me but now more than ever: my story has value. When I launched the NYG membership I once again had the privilege to learn and listen to people's stories of disability and chronic illness. Although our stories are similar, each is a unique and incredibly personal depiction of adversity, triumph and loss.

    The complex diagnoses that accompany chronic illnesses and disabilities can often result in stories filled with the heart-breaking recounting of losing every part of yourself only to find something that much more beautiful beneath all those layers. For many, uncovering the vulnerable inner you and having the courage to finally step out into the light as your true self, accepting and acknowledging both your strengths and limits, is freeing.

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  • How to create a support system

    How to Create a Support System

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    aring for a chronically ill bod is tiring, not to mention expensive, but what if there was a better way? People living with chronic illnesses need access to so many things, in fact you need a team of therapists, physios, occupational therapists, nutritionists and so many more. However, it’s rare we get the chance to have all that and even if you do it’s unlikely everyone in the team really understands chronic illness and disability, which is the key to getting the best care. Finding a specialist who really ‘gets’ what an illness or condition means for everyday living can take months or even years of research, trial and error, and is often an unaffordable expense.

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